Monday, 29 August 2011

Winged friends

A meeting of minds on Eryngium giganteum

Gatekeeper feeding on Phlox paniculata ‘Pina Colada’

A friendly Meadow Brown (note the single white dot on the wing, the similar Gatekeeper has two)

Small Tortoiseshell

A very pretty Bombus on Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote Giant’

Interesting moth, a Silver Y (positive mutterings have greeted my request for a moth trap, so we may soon get a chance to investigate these chaps in closer detail)

Comma making the most of V. bon

9 comments:

Diane said...

Bertie, your bees, butterflies and moths are wonderful. I don't know the names of any of them except the monarch!

Thanks for your comment. Now, I'm not sure that what I thought were perennial lobelia seedlings are indeed lobelia seedlings. They look exactly like them. Same leaf shape, same leaf size, same veins, etc, but now it looks like a flower is forming at the top. (Sort of aster-shaped.) I'll keep watching it, and maybe post a photo when the flower opens. My sense it that it's not a weed!

Cheers!

Pam's English Garden said...

Dear Bertie, Lovely photos! How I miss English butterflies and gardens. Especially now, since hurricane Irene made a bit of a mess of mine. Of course there are beautiful butterflies here too. I'm just feeling a little homesick. P. x

Prue said...

Your photos are excellent! Thanks for such a clear differentiation between the gatekeeper and meadow brown.
Keep up the good work, Bertie.

Janet said...

In my book you can never go wrong with images of insects especially of the winged varieties. Exquisite photos Bertie.

Rosemary said...

Lovely photos Bertie and beautifully complimented by the insects.

Share my Garden said...

Beautiful photos and a perfect small tortoiseshell. I love this intimate observation.

sally said...

nice pics old boy. i like the word 'bombus' :)

Elephant's Eye said...

Moth trap? Will they live? But then you raised butterflies, so I'm sure they will.

Your photos step me into another world, I feel I CAN step into your photos.

Bertie Bainbridge said...

Diana they will live, of course! The name is unfortunate, as it evokes images of capture and destruction, but the idea is to trap them overnight when they’re active and then record what you find in the morning before immediate release. I suspect we will have some interesting species living here but time will tell!

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